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TRUCK DISPATCH IN FLORIDA


Truck Dispatch in Florida You need to consider everything from how to navigate a load board and create an effective website to how to negotiate contracts and find and work with carriers

Guide: How to Become a Truck Dispatch

In this guide, I will take you through the steps of how to become a dispatcher for truck drivers and offer some useful tips on how to run a successful truck dispatcher business. You’ll learn:

1 What exactly a truck dispatcher does
2 The steps to become a truck dispatcher
3 Where to find carriers and loads

What Does a Truck Dispatch Do?

A truck dispatcher job is essentially to manage freight on behalf of a carrier. That includes using load boards and personal connections to locate freight that needs to be shipped, speaking to brokers, conducting negotiations, and eventually dispatching drivers and setting up their routes. In many cases, the position also includes some back-end work like reviewing truck drivers’ logs and tracking their hours.

A truck dispatching is often confused with a freight broker, but the two positions have different and distinct roles. A broker is a legal entity that serves as a middleman between the shipper or manufacturer (who needs their freight moved) and the carrier (who can move that freight). The freight broker is legally allowed to represent both the carrier and the shipper at the same time, but they should never have a personal investment in either side.

Unlike a freight broker, a truck dispatch usa is directly affiliated with a carrier and is consistently working on their behalf. Even if you are an independent freight dispatcher, you are still essentially an employee of whichever carrier you are currently working for and whenever you conduct negotiations with a freight broker, you do so on behalf of the carrier. Unlike brokers, freight dispatchers are not legally allowed to represent shippers or manufacturers.